Strohmenger obit

Carl Lee Strohmenger, 76, an active member of the environmental community, passed away suddenly from heart complications on January 26, 2021 at his home.

Born in Pennsylvania to Richard and Eileen Strohmenger, Carl came to Florida as a young child with his family eventually settling in Tampa. Carl received his bachelor’s degree in Chemistry from the University of Florida and then spent six years working on his Phd in Chemistry at UF in Gainesville. While in Gainesville, Carl became active in Sierra Club and other environmental clubs. Carl was also very involved in Spelunking (the exploration of caves) and scuba diving in caves.

After leaving Gainesville, Carl joined his father in the family business, Strohmenger Tool and Die. He became known in Tampa for the high quality of his work and the fact he could do jobs that other people could not. In the 90’s Carl took the job of running the University of South Florida machine shop where he specialized in building equipment for the research and academic processes for the medical researchers at the University. During his decades in Tampa, Carl was an active volunteer in the USF Botanical Gardens, Florida Trails, and the Tampa Bay Carnivorous Plant Society.

Due to cardiac medical conditions, Carl took early retirement in 2007. He moved to Marianna, FL, where he became active in University of Florida’s Master Gardner organization at Jackson County Extension Services.  Carl had a passion for nature and spent his free time volunteering and walking the many parks and trails of Central and North Florida.

Carl is survived by his wife, Patricia Strohmenger; brother, James Strohmenger and his wife, Patty Strohmenger; along with his nephews, J Michael Strohmenger and his wife, Roxana and Chris R Strohmenger and his wife, Ann Candler and children, Peyton, Graycie, and Tucker.

A memorial gathering is planned for later in the year when it is safe from covid. Marianna Chapel Funeral Home is in charge of arrangements.

For those wishing to remember Carl, planting a tree in his memory would honor the love he had for nature.